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Survey suggests lack of schedule control limits participation in wellness programs

April 13th, 2013

Organizations are struggling with the transition from a commute-to-the-cubicle, 20th century Industrial Age environment where work is performed during set times in centralized locations to one that affords more control over when and where work is performed. As a result, many are also struggling with wellness programs, finding that staff lack the time in their daily schedules for sustained physical activity, as shown by the recently released 2013 Global Workplace Health and Wellness Report. The findings of the survey 378 organizations in various industries and a link to the report can be found in this Forbes article, Employees Don’t Have Time for Wellness Initiatives.

The survey’s finding that lack of time for exercise is a major obstacle for wellness programs is hardly surprising. The Industrial Age work style consumes most of people’s waking hours and energies in minimum 8-hour-long “shifts” and time sucking, stressful commutes. All involving prolonged sitting that studies show adversely affect health status. Then when they get home mentally exhausted, it’s more inactivity and collapsing onto the couch, often with take-out food. And we wonder why as a society we’re getting fatter and sicker.

Achieving wellness requires exercise.  And sustained exercise performed on most days takes time. The implication to be drawn from the Global Workplace Health and Wellness Report is wellness isn’t so much as a “workplace” issue as a personal time management and lifestyle issue.

The good news is organizations have 21st century Information and Communications Technology (ICT) at their disposal to help alleviate the time crunch. ICT allows staff to work most any place and time, affording them more control over their personal schedules to engage in exercise programs in their own communities chosen by them and their health care professionals. While organizations clearly have a stake in the health of their members, health is ultimately an individual lifestyle choice. The National Wellness Institute defines wellness as “an active process through which people become aware of, and make choices toward, a more successful existence.” Making the right choice for health requires organizations provide their members sufficient control over their work schedules to exercise that choice.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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