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Health insurance returning to traditional role of covering unexpected, high cost care

February 19th, 2015

A basic insurance principle is returning to health coverage: mitigating the financial risk of a major, unexpected or accidental need for medical care. That’s how it worked in the period immediately following World War II, when health insurance was termed “major medical” and designed to cover high cost care such as injuries resulting from accidents or a medical crisis such as a heart attack or stroke.

The big driver of the change: sharply rising premium rates over the past decade. Costly premiums are driving people to choose plans with more cost sharing and the lower premiums that come with greater cost sharing such as deductibles, co-pays and co-insurance. Even when premium rates are subsidized, 85 percent of those purchasing individual plans sold on state health benefit exchanges in 2014 chose bronze and silver rated plans over higher priced gold and platinum rated plans that have less cost sharing. Bronze and silver rated plans cover 60 and 70 percent, respectively, of expected annual health care costs while gold and platinum, 80 and 90 percent.

The upshot of these less generous plans is people will become less inclined to view health plans as pre-paid medical care and more as insurance for medical financial emergencies. It’s back to the future of major medical plans of the 1950s and 1960s – a reversal of the all-inclusive managed care plan trend that began in the 1970s and 1980s.

A consequence is likely to be less wasteful utilization of primary care for issues that typically clear up on their own such seeking an antibiotic prescription for a minor cough. That’s a highly beneficial development amid widespread concern of a looming shortfall of primary care physicians at the same time more people gain medical coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

Related trends are the rise of cash paid primary care options including prepaid direct primary care physicians and clinics, retail and drugstore clinics and companies offering quickly accessible online telehealth consultations. These services provide consumers convenient care within and outside of normal business hours without the need for an appointment plus reduce the uncertainly of whether a particular primary care visit will be covered by their health plan. Also, tax advantaged health savings accounts that allow money to be set aside to pay for minor care.

All of this fits nicely into the growing ethos that wellness is a personal responsibility that for the vast majority of people is secured with healthful lifestyles rather than frequent engagement with medical providers.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

  1. Robynne Whitaker
    February 19th, 2015 at 14:26 | #1

    Well said, Fred. The current system is unsustainable.

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