Bill Clinton criticizes ACA gaps

At a campaign event for his wife in Flint, Mich., Bill Clinton had praised the law for insuring millions of Americans, but noted that many middle-class Americans were still unable to afford coverage and talked up his wife’s plan to allow those close to retirement age to buy into Medicare.

“The people who are getting killed on this deal are small business people and individuals who make just a little too much to get any of these subsidies because they’re not organized,” he said. “They don’t have any bargaining power with insurance companies so they’re getting whacked.

“So you’ve got this crazy system where all of a sudden 25 million more people have health care and then the people who are out there busting it, sometimes 60 hours a week, wind up with their premiums doubled and their coverage cut in half. It’s the craziest thing in the world.

Source: Bill Clinton’s Obamacare remarks put Hillary on the hot seat

The former president’s talking about shortcomings in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act relative to making health coverage more accessible and affordable for individuals and small employers. Regarding the former, I’ve referred to them as the “401 percenters” — those who exceed the household income cutoff of 400 percent of federal poverty for advance premium tax credits for individual qualified heath plans sold on state health benefit exchanges. There have been numerous accounts that even those with household incomes between 300 and 400 percent of federal poverty levels get too little in the way of subsidies to make coverage affordable or even worthwhile, federal income tax penalties for going bare notwithstanding.

As for Bill Clinton’s reference to small business, the Affordable Care Act envisioned small businesses organizing to gain some degree of bargaining power in the health benefit exchange’s Small Business Health Options Program known as SHOP. In theory, the SHOP was to enable small business to aggregate their market power, aided by the law’s creation of a single statewide risk pool for the small group market segment. In reality, it didn’t work out that way. SHOP turned out to be a flop, with little interest among small employers and insurance brokers in participating in the program.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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Frederick Pilot

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