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November elections increase likelihood of California revisiting single payer

December 21st, 2016

Various media accounts report that California of all states stands to lose the most federal funding for health care coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act – 20 to 25 billion dollars annually – if the law’s health insurance reforms are repealed as expected next year. The large majority of that sum comes from enhanced federal cost sharing under the law’s Medicaid eligibility expansion, representing more than $18 billion this year, according to this issue brief by the State Health Reform Assistance Network. Accounting for the balance are advance premium tax credits and cost sharing subsidies to offset the cost of qualified health plans purchased on the state’s health benefit exchange, Covered California.

Other media accounts portray California’s state policymakers as circling the wagons to fight this substantial loss of federal dollars given the potential for many low and moderate income households not covered by employer group plans to lose health coverage as well as extensive fiscal damage the state budget. But they are unlikely to prevail against the political will of Washington under the new administration and Congress and will have to consider alternatives. One likely candidate would be some form of single payer coverage, perhaps utilizing an all payer Accountable Care Organization (ACO) structure to hold down rising health care costs and financed by income, payroll and self-employment taxes.

In the previous two decades, single payer failed to gain voter approval when proposed as a ballot measure or as legislation. This time, however, with a supermajority vote margin gained in the November elections, legislative Democrats along with incumbent Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown could enact a single payer measure with — or without — support from Republican lawmakers. It would represent a far more radical reform than the Affordable Care Act. However, among the states, California has a sufficiently large population base and economy to go single payer if it chooses. The Golden State may well have to if it wants to carve out its own health reform destiny in the post Affordable Care Act era.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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