To “401 percenters” Affordable Care Act isn’t

WASHINGTON (AP) — Michael Schwarz is a self-employed business owner who buys his own health insurance. The subsidized coverage “Obamacare” offers protection from life’s unpredictable changes and freedom to pursue his vocation, he says.Brett Dorsch is also self-employed and buys his own health insurance. But he gets no financial break from the Affordable Care Act. “To me, it’s just been a big lie,” Dorsch says, forcing him to pay more for less coverage.Schwarz and Dorsch represent two Americas, pulling farther apart over former President Barack Obama’s health care law. Known as the ACA, the law rewrote the rules for people buying their own health insurance, creating winners and losers.Those with financial subsidies now fear being harmed by President Donald Trump and Republicans intent on repealing and replacing the ACA. But other consumers who also buy their own insurance and don’t qualify for financial help feel short-changed by Obama’s law. They’re hoping repeal will mean relief from rising premiums.

Source: News from The Associated Press

This is one of the major weaknesses of the Affordable Care Act’s reforms of the individual medical insurance market. Naturally, households earning in excess of 400 percent of federal poverty and who don’t qualify for subsidies are going to be unhappy since they bear the full brunt of premium increases as health plan issuers try to stabilize the market segment under the the law’s provisions by raising premiums. It’s no surprise these 401 percenters as I dubbed them aren’t in favor of keeping those rules in place since from their perspective, they’ve gotten a raw deal other than appreciating the rule requiring plans to accept them regardless of medical history.

The situation also points up the problem of a means-tested scenario of providing medical coverage to those not covered by employer-sponsored plans or Medicare. It’s far from seamless under the Affordable Care Act. The law created multiple categories of benefits and costs for this cohort keyed to household income: 1) Medicaid; 2) Qualified Health Plans offered on state health benefit exchanges with subsidies based on multiple income tranches; and 3) Unsubsidized plans, typically sold outside of the exchanges.

A more elegant, unified scenario is sorely needed, particularly given more households now rely on earnings outside of formal employment arrangements that come with medical benefits or are employed by small employers offering little or minimal coverage.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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Frederick Pilot

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