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Why medical care payment reform is a wicked problem

May 29th, 2017

“You can have a picture of what the final system would look like,” says Katharine London of the University of Massachusetts, coauthor of a series of studies of a Vermont single-payer plan that eventually was abandoned. “But the biggest hurdle for single-payer is how you get from here to there.” That journey involves persuading voters that the system they’re so enthusiastic about in the abstract will function to their advantage in reality. That’s a hard task. “People by and large like the health insurance they have,” in part because most people have limited or infrequent interactions with the healthcare system, Gruber says. “They’re not willing to give up something they like enough for something unknown.”

Source: The challenges in setting up a California single-payer system are daunting — but not insurmountable – LA Times

Jonathan Gruber –who consulted on the drafting of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — is right on the money in his analysis. The pie chart below showing all forms of medical coverage in the nation’s largest state illustrates why medical care payment reform is such a wicked problem. Yes, it’s byzantine with all those slices of the pie covering different groups of people. But the people covered within each slice are generally satisfied with their coverage and thus not inclined to give up their slice in order to put everyone into one big pie of single payer where a governmental entity would pay all medical bills. That especially applies to employer group medical benefit plans that provide the bulk of private sector coverage to those under age 65.

 

Public sources account for 71% of healthcare revenues in California, including 60% from federal progSource: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. Public Funds Account for Over 70 Percent of Health Care Spending In California. August 31, 2016.
 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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