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Posts Tagged ‘CALHEERS’

Achieving single, integrated marketplace for individual, Medicaid health plans faces initial difficulties

Section 1413(c)(1) of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires each state to “develop for all applicable State health subsidy programs a secure, electronic interface allowing an exchange of data …that allows a determination of eligibility for all such programs based on a single application.” That means state health benefit exchanges must operate as integrated marketplaces offering both commercial insurance plans (referred to as Qualified Health Plans or QHPs) as well as Medicaid coverage for those whose household incomes meet their state’s Medicaid eligibility guidelines. The policy rationale – known as “no wrong door” and “one touch and you’re done” – is to reduce the ranks of the medically uninsured by simplifying the process of getting health coverage and removing roadblocks to enrollment.

Implementing that Affordable Care Act mandate, however, has been challenging from IT integration standpoint given the variety of legacy state computer systems that manage their Medicaid programs and state rules governing them, including those of the three dozen states using the federal marketplace, healthcare.gov.

That’s also been the case in California, where enrollment elegance has proven elusive. “I think we’ve oversold simplicity,” said Frank J. Mecca, executive director of the County Welfare Directors Association of California. Mecca made that observation today at a California Healthcare Foundation (CHCF) briefing in Sacramento on early consumer experiences with enrollment in the Golden State’s exchange, Covered California.

Mecca described the IT interface between the California Healthcare Eligibility, Enrollment and Retention System (CALHEERS) and the IT system that manages Medicaid eligibility and enrollment, the Statewide Automated Welfare System (SAWS) as a “clogged highway.” Consequently, Mecca noted, a large backlog of potential Medicaid enrollees remain stuck in the system. Mecca credited Covered California and the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS), the state’s Medicaid administrator, for their efforts to remedy the backlog and improve the interface between the two IT systems. “It’s not an easy thing to fix,” Mecca added. “Things have improved tremendously, but we still have a long way to go.”

Both Mecca and another panelist at the briefing, Sonya Vasquez, policy director of the community-based health advocacy and policy organization, Community Health, said greater emphasis should be placed on marketing both Covered California QHPs as well as Medi-Cal, the state’s Medicaid program, particularly given Medi-Cal does not have set enrollment periods. They also said more effort should be made to make consumers aware in-person assistance is available for those seeking to enroll in coverage, including welfare department staff who can sign up applicants for either Covered California QHPs or Medi-Cal. (California is among those states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to 138 percent of federal poverty guidelines).

Consumers participating in focus groups conducted in early 2014 by PerryUndem Research/Communication were mostly uninsured and had substantial knowledge gaps for both Medi-Cal and QHP coverage and advance tax credit subsidies for the latter for households with incomes between 138 and 400 percent of federal poverty. (Click here for the full report on the findings presented at today’s CHCF briefing.)

 


The ACA health insurance market reforms are at hand. Need help understanding and preparing for the new regulatory landscape and the health benefit exchange marketplace -- and explaining them to your key stakeholders?  Pilot Healthcare Strategies can help with expert analysis and clear communications. For a free initial consultation, email me at fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

California could opt to offer Medicaid “bridge plans” on exchange rather than expand Medicaid eligibility

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Despite the assumption that California would opt to expand Medicaid eligibility to households with incomes between 100 and 133 percent of federal poverty guidelines as permitted under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the policy question remains open in the Golden State.  A number of sticking points remain as detailed in this story in today’s Los Angeles Times.  Chief among them is Gov. Jerry Brown’s expectation that since counties would benefit from the expansion through a reduced burden of caring for indigents not currently eligible for Medi-Cal as it’s called in California, they should help Sacramento shoulder the state’s future federal Medicaid cost share.

According to The Times, the Brown administration is also concerned that allowing people to enroll in Medi-Cal online could encourage fraud.  California is rushing to ready an online enrollment system, the California Eligibility, Enrollment and Retention System (CALHEERS), to implement the Affordable Care Act’s mandate that individuals and families be offered enrollment for both government insurance programs like Medi-Cal and private coverage offered through its health benefit exchange thorough a single, streamlined application process.  The unresolved policy question of whether to expand Medi-Cal eligibility poses significant potential to complicate an already complex process to prepare the online system and to provide enrollees what state officials expect to be a customer-friendly “no wrong door” experience.  Problems integrating the state’s legacy Medi-Cal eligibility computer software with CALHEERs have already delayed plans to have it functional by the October 1 pre-enrollment date for 2014 coverage until January 1, 2014.

While the Brown administration’s concerns over expanding eligibility for Medi-Cal have stalled legislation that would do so, the administration is sponsoring pending legislation, SBX1-3, that would authorize commercial Medicaid managed care “bridge plans” per federal guidance issued in December, 2012 for those earning up to 200 percent of federal poverty.  The plans would be available through the state’s exchange marketplace, Covered California.

Since the Affordable Care Act deems households with incomes of at least 100 percent of federal poverty eligible to buy coverage through the exchange marketplace, the bridge plan option provides policymakers an alternative to expanding Medi-Cal eligibility to 133 percent of federal poverty.  Some states that have declined to expand Medicaid eligibility including Tennessee, Arkansas and Oklahoma are negotiating with the federal Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services to obtain waivers to allow their Medicaid eligibles to purchase commercial coverage on their exchanges. Absent a near term political agreement to expand Medi-Cal eligibility, California could soon be among them.

If the trend continues, it could lead to a bifurcated Medicaid system: basic, legacy Medicaid for those households with incomes below 100 percent of federal poverty guidelines and a “super Medicaid” system of federally subsidized coverage for households with incomes above the poverty line that wouldn’t otherwise qualify for Medicaid.  It would also have fiscal implications for the states electing to “expand” Medicaid eligibility via Medicaid bridge plans sold on their health benefit exchange marketplaces since it would reduce their future federal Medicaid cost share burden, shifting subsidization fully to the federal government in the form of advance income tax credits.

 


The ACA health insurance market reforms are at hand. Need help understanding and preparing for the new regulatory landscape and the health benefit exchange marketplace -- and explaining them to your key stakeholders?  Pilot Healthcare Strategies can help with expert analysis and clear communications. For a free initial consultation, email me at fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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