Tag Archive: essential health benefits

Trump administration adopts market-based statement of health care policy

Nearly nine months into his administration after many months of policy debate in Washington, President Donald Trump has issued an official statement of his administration’s health care policy in an October 12, 2017 Executive Order.

Trump’s policy is essentially not much different than that of his predecessor, Barack Obama, insofar as it retains one of the nation’s largest private sector financing mechanisms: employee benefit medical care plans. Like the managed competition principle of Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Trump’s policy is market-based and aspires to harness competitive market forces to reduce medical costs and increase access to coverage.

It also mirrors the Affordable Care Act insurance market reforms by concentrating on the small employer group and individual (non-group) market segments where medical care cost pressures hit hardest. The order suggests (not orders) his administration explore allowing small employers to participate in association health plans traditionally used by large employer groups. In addition, Trump suggested his administration consider proposing regulations or revising guidance to increase the use of Health Reimbursement Accounts (HRAs) and expand employers’ ability to offer HRAs to their employees and allow HRAs to be used in conjunction with non-group coverage for employees.

The latter element closely aligns with recent legislation signed into law late in the Obama administration that enables employers to use a new type of HRA to subsidize premiums on a pre-tax basis for employees obtaining coverage in the non-group market. Effective January 1, 2017, employers of 49 or fewer employees that do not offer group coverage can fund up to $4,950 annually for single employees and $10,000 for an individual plan covering an employee and their family members.

Various observers expressed concern at the executive order’s suggestion (once again couched as a request, not a directive) that the administration consider reversing an Obama administration restriction limiting short term individual medical insurance policies to a maximum term of three months and expanding the limit to 12 months or even longer. The concern is well placed because doing so would put short term plans in competition with non-group and small group plans sold with the standard 12 month coverage term.

The Affordable Care Act established ten essential benefit categories with the goal to put small group and non-group coverage on a par with large group plans. But the tradeoff for these more generous plans is high and rapidly rising premium rates and deductibles, particularly painful for households earning too much to qualify for premium and cost sharing subsidies for individual plans sold on state health benefit exchanges. However, short term plans offering skimpier coverage for lower cost won’t comply with the Affordable Care Act’s minimum coverage mandate for individual taxpayers, subjecting them to a tax penalty.

Finally, Trump’s executive order reinforces market-based approach to mediate medical care costs by requiring the Health and Human Services Department in consultation with the departments of Treasury and Labor as well as the Federal Trade Commission to produce a report by April 12, 2018 and every two years following outlining where existing state and federal policy hinders market competition. The report must also identify policy actions to reduce barriers to market entry, limit excessive consolidation and prevent abuses of market power.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Sorry, We Don’t Take Obamacare – The New York Times

The goal of the Affordable Care Act, which took effect in 2013, was to provide insurance to tens of millions of uninsured or under-insured Americans, through online state and federal marketplaces offering an array of policies. By many measures, the law has been a success: The number of uninsured Americans has dropped by about half, with 20 million more people gaining coverage. It has also created a host of new policies for self-employed people like Ms. Moses, who previously had insurance but whose old plans were no longer offered.Yet even as many beneficiaries acknowledge that they might not have insurance today without the law, there remains a strong undercurrent of discontent. Though their insurance cards look the same as everyone else’s — with names like Liberty and Freedom from insurers like Anthem or United Health — the plans are often very different from those provided to most Americans by their employers. Many say they feel as if they have become second-class patients.

Source: Sorry, We Don’t Take Obamacare – The New York Times

A primary goal of the Affordable Care Act when enacted was to tame the “Wild West” landscape of individual health coverage and put it more on a par with employer-sponsored coverage. And to provide more peace of mind to those having individual coverage.

It did so by defining essential health benefits and minimum actuarial value of individual plans. According to this New York Times story, that hoped for relative degree of parity has yet to be achieved, with employer-sponsored plans that cover the majority of working age adults remaining preferred by providers.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

California leaning toward Kaiser Permanente’s small group HMO as individual and small group plan benchmark

California continues moving forward to implement the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), advancing legislation this week setting minimum coverage standards for health plans offered by small employers and sold through the California Health Benefit Exchange.

Section 1302 of the PPACA delineates 10 “essential health benefits” small group and individual market plans must offer including ambulatory and emergency services, hospitalization, maternity and newborn care, treatment for mental health and substance use disorders, prescription drugs, rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices, laboratory services, preventive and wellness services and chronic disease management and pediatric services, including oral and vision care.

Since health insurance markets vary among the states and to speed state efforts to establish health benefit exchanges, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services late last year issued guidance allowing states to choose one of the following plans sold in their jurisdictions as a benchmark:

  • One of the three largest small group plans in the state;
  • One of the three largest state employee health plans;
  • One of the three largest federal employee health plan options;
  • The largest HMO plan offered in the state’s commercial market.

California advanced legislation this week, AB 1453, defining HMO Kaiser Permanente’s small group plan as of December 31, 2011 as the Golden State’s benchmark.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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