Tag Archive: grandfather clause

Federal government expands ACA transitional relief for individual, small group plans

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued guidance today affording states and health plan issuers more time to optionally keep in place health plans not compliant with Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requirements relating to minimum benefit levels, modified community based rating and guaranteed issue to all applicants without medical underwriting.

The Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight’s extended transitional policy provides transitional relief from these requirements for plans issued through October 1, 2016 as well as the ACA’s requirement that health plan issuers use single statewide risk pools for the individual and small group markets, respectively.

The newly issued guidance follows on similar guidance issued to state insurance commissioners in November 2013 that gave states the option of relieving individual and small group plans from these ACA provisions through September 2015. That guidance was issued in response to a consumer uproar when health plans issued cancellation notices for non-ACA compliant health plans — many of them falling into a time gap between grandfathered plans that were in place when the ACA was enacted in March 2010 and January 1, 2014 when all individual and small group plans must be ACA compliant. President Obama complained the ACA grandfather clause proved “insufficient” in allowing for this gap.

Today’s guidance also extends guidance issued December 19, 2013 permitting individuals whose non-ACA compliant policies were cancelled to qualify for a hardship exemption from the requirement all individuals have health coverage. That exemption allows them to purchase catastrophic coverage and is being extended to October 1, 2016.

Under today’s guidance, states may choose to adopt both the November 2013 transitional policy and the extended transitional policy through October 1, 2016, or adopt one but not the other. States also have the option to apply the relief to both the individual and the small group markets or just one market. Additionally, states can opt to apply the transitional relief solely to large employers if they choose to define the small group market as being employers of 100 or fewer employees for policy years beginning on or after January 1, 2016 as authorized by the ACA.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

States tell Obama: Let the market sort it out

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act intervenes massively in the individual and small group health insurance markets. Effective January 1, 2014, it establishes standards on what health plans must offer, who can buy them, when and where they can purchase coverage, and who is eligible for subsidies to defray monthly premiums.

With any market overhaul on the scale of the ACA’s, there is bound to be disruption of the existing marketplace and push back from those adversely affected. Among the first are those who have individual plans that don’t comply with the new ACA coverage standards issued after March 23, 2010 and are thus not grandfathered under the ACA’s grandfathering provision. They are being hit with a double whammy. Not only are these policies being shut down by the end of the year. People who have them are being informed they will have to replace them with richer plans that meet ACA standards – and those more robust plans will cost them more. Their displeasure prompted the Obama administration to accommodate their concerns by giving states the option to keep those plans well into 2015.

So far, a lot of the states including most recently, California, have instead decided they will carry on and let the market sort it out given so little remaining time for regulators, state-operated health exchanges and health plan issuers to make the needed adjustments during the year-end holiday period that would only confuse consumers. State insurance commissioners cited a lack of consensus on the issue in declining a White House meeting this week.

Moreover, some consumers will still have some options to keep their existing coverage if their plan issuer takes advantage of an ACA loophole that allows issuers to “early renew” coverage by December 31, 2013, thereby extending their coverage for as late as December 31, 2014. Still, not everyone with these plans will be happy as they too will likely come with higher premiums thanks to the relentless underlying trend of rising health care costs.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Obama cites “insufficient” ACA grandfather clause for policy cancellation uproar

At a press briefing this week announcing his administration will allow individual and small group health plan issuers to temporarily continue offering plans that don’t meet new Affordable Care Act standards effective January 1, 2014, President Obama blamed a shortcoming in the law for the confusion and angst arising from cancellation notices plan issuers recently sent out informing policyholders their current coverage is being cancelled. That coverage will no longer be ACA compliant effective January 1, the notices explained, thereby requiring policyholders to get into new plans that meet ACA coverage standards that take effect that year. Here’s what the president said, according to a White House transcript of the briefing:

With respect to the pledge I made that if you like your plan, you can keep it, I think — and I’ve said in interviews — that there is no doubt that the way I put that forward unequivocally ended up not being accurate. It was not because of my intention not to deliver on that commitment and that promise. We put a grandfather clause into the law, but it was insufficient.

What is the “insufficient” ACA grandfather clause referred to by the president? It’s at Section 1251(a)(2) of the law:

 (2) CONTINUATION OF COVERAGE.—As revised by section 10103(d)(1). Except as provided in paragraph (3), with respect to a group health plan or health insurance coverage in which an individual was enrolled on the date of enactment of this Act, this subtitle and subtitle A (and the amendments made by such subtitles) shall not apply to such plan or coverage, regardless of whether the individual renews such coverage after such date of enactment.

That means those enrolled in individual and small group plans as of the March 23, 2010 ACA enactment date can remain in them. But that’s’ where the insufficiency comes in. It doesn’t apply to plans that came about after the March 23, 2010 ACA enactment date. Those plans aren’t grandfathered and become legally obsolete for plan years starting January 1, 2014 and later. Rather than letting them fall through the cracks and to tamp down outrage over the cancellation notices, the administration is asking plan issuers and state regulators to take it up on a voluntary waiver offer to extend these plans out as far as September 30, 2015.

Congress is also acting to amend Section 1251(a)(2) to bring the orphan plans within the scope of the grandfather clause.

H. R. 3406 and S. 1617 would retroactively extend the clause to state:

(2) CONTINUATION OF COVERAGE- With respect to a group health plan or health insurance coverage in which an individual was enrolled during any part of the period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act and ending on December 31, 2013, this subtitle and subtitle A (and the amendments made by such subtitles) shall not apply to such plan or coverage, regardless of whether the individual renews such coverage. (New text shown in italics).

Passed this week by the House, H.R. 3350 does not amend the ACA but rather enacts new law that allows health plan issuers with individual plans in effect as of January 1, 2013 to continue to sell the plans outside of the state health benefit exchange marketplace in 2014 and deems these plans grandfathered for the purposes of meeting minimum plan benefit standards effective that year.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

%d bloggers like this: