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Posts Tagged ‘House v. Price’

Administration, Congress would leave CSR subsidies in limbo in latest court filing

May 22nd, 2017 Comments off

President Donald Trump and House Republicans have decided not to blow up the Obamacare health insurance markets just yet. In a filing to a federal appeals court Monday, the Justice Department and lawyers representing House Republicans have requested another 90-day delay in the proceedings from a case challenging the legality of payments made to health insurers serving low-income customers. “The parties continue to discuss measures that would obviate the need for judicial determination of this appeal, including potential legislative action,” attorneys for both parties wrote to the appeals court.

Source: Trump Decides Not To Blow Up Obamacare — Yet | HuffPost

If the U.S. District Court of Appeals grants this request, the legal uncertainty over the reduced cost sharing subsidies for silver actuarial value (AV) plans sold in state health benefit exchanges would potentially continue for the rest of the summer. As the article notes, those subsidies could be cut off at any time by the Trump administration and an appeal in the case, House v. Price, dropped. That would leave intact a U.S. District Court ruling one year ago finding the subsidies cannot be allocated by the executive branch without congressional appropriation. Neither the Trump administration nor the current Congress are committed to keeping the exchange market functional and have little motivation to resolve the matter.

These circumstances will likely prompt plan issuers to increase plan year 2018 premium rates as a precaution as rate filings are due to state regulators in the next month since the Affordable Care Act would continue to require them to offer more generous coverage than standard 70 percent AV silver plans for households earning below 250 percent of federal poverty levels and purchasing though the exchanges. At least one plan issuer, Anthem, has indicated it would have to boost premiums by at least 20 percent to cover the potential loss of the CSR subsidies.

A second consecutive year of double digit premium increases could threaten the actuarial viability of the state non-group market risk pools since those eligible for little or no advance premium tax credit subsidies would likely flee the market. Particularly if the Trump administration doesn’t enforce the ACA’s individual mandate, making that option more appealing.

Some state regulators including California and most recently New Mexico have asked plan issuers to file two sets of premium rates, one assuming continuation of the subsidies and another without them.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Non-group market faces decidedly mixed outlook for plan year 2018 — and possible demise in 2019.

April 27th, 2017 Comments off

Several recent positive developments point toward plan issuers staying in the non-group or individual market next year.

  • The Trump administration finalized its Market Stabilization rulemaking intended to build confidence among plans by affording them more predictability and reducing the possibility of consumer gaming that plans say have increased their loss exposure.
  • On April 7, Standard & Poor’s opined that the individual market is showing signs of stabilizing in its fourth year based on its analysis of Blue Cross Blue Shield plans that found loss ratios declined from 106 and 102 percent for 2015 and 2014, respectively, to 92 percent for 2016.
  • This week in a closely watched move, Anthem tentatively committed to the individual market in 2018, but warned it could change its mind or raise premium rates by 20 percent or more depending on the outcome of pending litigation over cost sharing reduction subsidies that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act makes available to households earning between 100 and 250 of federal poverty levels for silver actuarial value plans sold on state health benefit exchanges.

Which brings us to the negatives. If the litigation, House v. Price, is not resolved by early June, Anthem could execute the aforementioned steep rate increases and possible state market withdrawals. The likelihood is high. The reason is neither the House of Representatives nor the Trump administration has sufficient motivation to resolve the case. The House prevailed when the U.S. District Court where the case was brought issued a ruling one year ago agreeing with the House that the Obama administration unconstitutionally infringed on the House’s appropriation powers by funding the cost sharing reductions administratively.

The district court held the ruling in abeyance pending appeal by the administration. That decision is likely to become final and go into effect following a status conference with the parties late next month. The Trump administration isn’t likely to appeal the decision and would be happy to see a final ruling “blow up” the Affordable Care Act’s individual insurance market reforms in President Trump’s words. The House for its part isn’t likely to dismiss the case because it sees the ruling in its favor as an important precedent to check executive branch authority from impinging on its powers of appropriation.

In addition, Congress and the Trump administration are unlikely to moot the case by enacting their own health care reform legislation in place of the Affordable Care Act’s insurance market reforms in the current congressional term due to heavy reliance on the limited scope budget reconciliation process, intra-party squabbling, lack of bi-partisan support and the inability or unwillingness of the Trump administration to articulate clear guiding policy principles.

The loss of the cost sharing subsidies would blow a hole estimated at $10 billion in exchange finances. That could well prompt Anthem and other plan issuers to head for the exits just as their plans must be finalized for 2018. That could effectively end the exchanges and the individual market as a whole next year. The more likely scenario is the plans as Anthem indicated it would price in the loss of the cost sharing subsidies in their final premium rates.

That would keep the individual market alive and on life support for 2018. But it would face a possible demise in 2019, with shrunken statewide risk pools and increased risk of the dreaded death spiral of adverse selection. The number of covered lives would decline both inside and outside of the exchanges. Outside the exchanges, the 401 percenters – households earning more than 400 percent of federal poverty levels and ineligible for premium tax credit subsidies for qualified health plans sold on the state exchanges – would likely bolt from the individual market after getting notice of another 20 plus percent premium increase for the second consecutive year. (California’s exchange, Covered California, estimates the loss of reduced cost sharing subsidies would boost premiums double that amount, 42 percent on average and as many as 340,000 Californians would drop out of the individual market in 2018.) They will file for exemptions from the individual mandate based on unaffordable premiums, seek alternatives such as health sharing ministries or simply go bare in the hope the Internal Revenue Service under the Trump administration won’t enforce the individual mandate penalties for not having coverage.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Congress holds trump card on exchange cost sharing reduction subsidies (pun intended)

April 13th, 2017 Comments off

In the coming weeks, the Trump administration will need to say clearly whether they plan to fund cost-sharing reductions — payments that reimburse insurers for providing discounted deductibles to low-income ObamaCare enrollees. In an interview with The Wall Street Journal Wednesday, Trump said he was considering withholding the payments to force Democrats to work with him on healthcare.

Source: Trump faces risky ObamaCare choice | TheHill

Actually Congress — and not the Trump administration — holds far more power to resolve the outstanding issue of funding for cost sharing reduction subsidies for plans sold on state health benefit exchanges that’s giving non-group health plan issuers heartburn as they prepare for plan year 2018.

First because the House of Representatives brought the underlying litigation over the constitutionality of the Obama administration’s funding of the subsidies. It as petitioner — and not the executive branch as respondent — can make the litigation go away by dropping it. A federal district court that decided the case in favor of the House last May put its ruling on hold, giving the House the option to drop the case.

Second because Congress holds the power of the purse. It ultimately decides whether funds for the subsidies are appropriated, not the administration.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Ongoing uncertainty over cost sharing subsidies hangs over state health benefit exchange marketplace

April 7th, 2017 Comments off

Insurers are worried the payments could be discontinued, which could throw things into chaos and cause insurers to pull out of the marketplaces. However, Kristine Grow, a spokeswoman for America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), said Thursday that it is not enough for the payments to simply continue during the lawsuit. She said insurers need certainty that the payments will be there throughout 2018, or else they might need to raise premiums for next year to factor in the uncertainty. She said AHIP would like to see Congress appropriate the money for 2018 or provide some other guarantee that the money will be there throughout next year.

Source: Trump administration to continue ObamaCare insurer payments during House lawsuit | TheHill

Litigation over the constitutionality of federal funding of out of pocket cost sharing subsidies for individual plans offered on state health benefit exchanges continues with no clear direction on its ultimate resolution. While the Trump administration states funding for the subsidies available to households earning between 100 and 250 percent of federal poverty levels will continue in the meantime, given the volatile policy situation with a new administration and Congress taking office this year, health plan issuers aren’t taking that assurance at face value. They want more policy certainty given that funding stream will need to be available through 2018 as they develop and price products over the next several weeks.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

State health benefit exchanges not out of the woods yet

March 28th, 2017 Comments off

State health benefit exchanges dodged a legislative bullet last week that would have eliminated advance premium tax credit (APTC) subsidies to help low and moderate income households purchase non-group coverage. The nation’s largest exchange, Covered California, estimated the tabled budget reconciliation bill replacing the subsidies with an age-based tax credit beginning in 2020 would on average amount to only 60 percent of that provided under the APTC subsidies. That would have made coverage for less affordable for many households and potentially led to a dramatic drop in enrollment qualified health plans sold on the exchanges, shrinking the non-group risk pool and reducing spread of risk.

The exchanges now face a more immediate threat that could significantly disrupt plan year 2018 and potentially current year enrollees: the loss of cost sharing reduction (CSR) subsidies for silver level plans sold on the exchanges. The subsidies are available to households earning between 100 and 250 percent of federal poverty levels. By reducing out of pocket costs for eligible households, the subsidies effectively increase the actuarial value of silver plans that cover on average 70 percent of medical care costs.

A U.S. District court ruling issued last May found the Obama administration acted unconstitutionally in funding the subsidies without an explicit appropriation by Congress. The decision was put on hold pending appeal, where it sits pending possible action to resolve the underlying fiscal issue by the Trump administration and Congress. Without federal funding for the CSR subsidies, health plan issuers participating in the exchanges would incur billions in losses, according to an analysis prepared earlier this month by The Commonwealth Fund. There is no requested appropriation to cover the CSR subsidies in the Trump administration’s 2018 budget blueprint. As last week’s failed attempt to advance the budget reconciliation legislation illustrates, the Trump administration and Congress are unlikely to achieve a rapid agreement resolving the litigation as they struggle to form a majority party governing coalition.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Fate of 2018 individual market could turn on plan issuer response to proposed Market Stabilization rulemaking

March 22nd, 2017 Comments off

With efforts to enact a successor to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act bogging down in the legislative process as health plan issuers must soon make decisions on their participation in the individual market and state health benefit exchanges for plan year 2018, much could ride on the Trump administration’s pending Market Stabilization administrative rulemaking and whether it will instill sufficient market confidence among plan issuers worried about losses and adverse selection. Indeed, the outcome of the rulemaking could well determine whether an individual market exists at all in many states next year as Congress debates changes to the Affordable Care Act’s commercial medical insurance market reforms but also the scope and financing of the six-decade-old Medicaid program.

The Department of Health and Human Services is fast tracking the rulemaking and currently reviewing about 4,000 comments received by the March 7 comment deadline. The scope of the rulemaking would directly apply to plans offered on state health benefit exchanges in states where the federal government operates the exchange or provides the online enrollment platform. As for the dozen states that operate their own exchanges, HHS states in the proposed rulemaking it understands those exchanges may not be able to implement the rule in 2017. It asked for comment on an appropriate transitional period for state-based exchanges and whether the rule should be optional for them. HHS also sought comment on how the rulemaking should apply to plans sold outside the exchanges.

The proposed rule is aimed at reducing the likelihood of enrollee gaming and adverse selection by requiring verification of eligibility for special enrollment periods and supporting continuous enrollment. It would more closely conform individual coverage to employer-sponsored and Medicare coverage by establishing the plan year 2018 open enrollment period as November 1 to December 15, 2017. The rulemaking would require those seeking to enroll outside this period to provide documented evidence of life events such as a change in family status or loss of employer-sponsored coverage. It also would make it easier for health plan issuers to collect lapsed premium payments from the prior year upon renewal, liberalizes the actuarial value definitions of all but silver plans as affords states and plan issuers greater leeway for determining provider network adequacy.

“Continued uncertainty around the future of the markets and concerns regarding the risk pools are two of the primary reasons issuer participation in some areas around the country has been limited,” HHS stated in the preamble to the proposed rule. “The proposed changes in this rule are intended to promote issuer participation in these markets and to address concerns raised by issuers, states, and consumers. We believe such changes would result in broader choices and more affordable coverage.”

While the rulemaking is intended to provide a degree of certainty to plan issuers, it can’t provide a full remedy. The lack of quick legislative progress on an ACA successor has increased the likelihood a federal court ruling finding executive branch funding of out of pocket cost subsidies for silver plans sold on the exchanges unconstitutional will take effect. Implementation of the ruling is temporarily on hold pending legislative action. With both inter and intra party legislative gridlock on health care reform, the Trump administration is far less likely to appeal the decision, allowing it to stand.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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