Tag Archive: managed care plans

Many Say High Deductibles Make Their Health Law Insurance All but Useless – NYTimes.com

But in interviews, a number of consumers made it clear that premiums were only one side of the affordability equation.“Our deductible is so high, we practically pay for all of our medical expenses out of pocket,” said Wendy Kaplan, 50, of Evanston, Ill. “So our policy is really there for emergencies only, and basic wellness appointments.”Her family of four pays premiums of $1,200 a month for coverage with an annual deductible of $12,700.

Source: Many Say High Deductibles Make Their Health Law Insurance All but Useless – NYTimes.com

Americans are having a difficult time adjusting to the new, old “major medical” health coverage of the 1950s and 1960s characterized by high deductible health plans that are rapidly increasing among individual and employer-paid health coverage. For decades starting in the 1970s, “health insurance” was managed care HMO plans that functioned as pre-paid medical care for lower cost care as well as insurance in the traditional sense of the word cover unexpected, high cost events such as accidents and heart attacks requiring surgery and hospital stays. (The California HealthCare Foundation recently issued an updated interactive chart showing the shift from cash to private insurance paid physician and clinical services from 1960 through 2013.)

Now it’s more just plain insurance as it was in the pre-HMO days. Americans are once again paying directly out of pocket for routine and minor care. And they’re not happy about it as this story illustrates. It doesn’t jibe with their expectations relative to the fourth word of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: affordable.

Aside from the difficulties associated with going “back to the future” with major medical plans, people are likely to have a difficult time grasping the value of paying a high premium for catastrophic coverage. They are naturally going to figure if they’re covering what’s known in health insurance as “first dollar” care costs until the deductible limit kicks in, then the premium should be quite low since that is where most of the utilization occurs. It shouldn’t approximate the amount of a monthly housing payment as in the example above. What’s telling here is Ms. Kaplan’s age. The Affordable Care Act allows the use of age as a factor in setting premiums. Once people reach age 50, premium rate-wise the individual health insurance market can be nearly as unfriendly to over 50s as it was before the Affordable Care Act market reforms took effect in 2014.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

California bill mandating standard benefit designs for plans sold outside exchange marketplace conflicts with existing state law

Earlier this year, California’s health benefit exchange marketplace, Covered California, exercised an option under its enabling legislation to standardize benefit designs for health plans sold on the exchange, consistent with its active purchaser role.

Pending legislation, SB 639, would require individual market plans sold off the exchange marketplace to also employ standard benefit designs. SB 639 would do so by adding new law mandating standardized product designs for all individual plans at each of the metal tier actuarial value rating levels.  It does so with language barring the sale of any product at each of the metal tier levels “unless it is a standardized product” consistent with current law (Health & Safety Code Section 1366.6 and Insurance Code Section 10112.3).

But therein lay a conflict.  These statutes require plan issuers not participating in the exchange “offer at least one standardized product that has been designated by the Exchange in each of the four levels of coverage,” provided the Exchange exercises its authority to require standardized benefit designs. At least one obviously does not encompass all plans offered outside the exchange marketplace.  (Emphasis added)

SB 639 awaits a vote by the full California Senate.  Meanwhile, a Senate floor analysis of the bill shows opposition from health plans and their trade associations.  America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) complains that “the standardization of health products is not only unnecessary but also impedes the ability of carriers to provide benefit packages aimed at meeting the preferences and needs of consumers,” and that benefit design flexibility “is an important element to assuring affordability and high-quality care.”

Update 5/30/13: The bill was approved by the California Senate on a 28-11 vote on May 29 and now goes to the Assembly.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Analysis: Employees to face healthcare sticker shock | Reuters

Over the next 18 months, between one quarter and one half of Americans who get insurance coverage through their employers will pay more of their doctor bills themselves as companies roll out healthcare plans with higher deductibles, benefits consultants say. The result: sticker shock.

“They have huge out-of-pocket costs before they get any insurance coverage, it’s a real slap in the face,” said Ron Pollack, the executive director of Families USA, a healthcare advocacy group.

via Analysis: Employees to face healthcare sticker shock | Reuters.

Mr. Pollack is reacting — badly — to a back to the future shift in health insurance, to a period prior to the emergence of all inclusive managed care plans in the 1970s and 1980s.  We are witnessing the re-emergence of health insurance that was known in period following WWII as “major medical.”  It was a true insurance product insofar as insurance by definition is designed to cover high cost, unexpected needs such as a hospital stay.  Routine, out of pocket costs were just that: paid out of the patient’s pocket.  And from all indications, it’s here to stay.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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