Tag Archive: out of pocket costs

Paying cash and negotiating price: Will it reduce the cost of health care and coverage?

Many of us now have high-deductible health insurance plans, which makes us “cash-pay” patients until we meet our deductibles. According to a Health Affairs health policy brief, high deductible plans are now much more prevalent in both individual and group markets.The higher the deductible, the lower the monthly premium. If you have a high deductible plan and don’t consume much medical care, you are most likely a cash pay patient. You might even avoid medical care because of the out of pocket cost. I know I have.I talked with a friend yesterday who has a $9,000 deductible. She has a torn meniscus. She is avoiding the surgery because she isn’t even close to hitting her plan’s deductible. I suggested she try asking for a “cash pay” price from her surgeon and the hospital or surgery center where her procedure would be performed. Negotiating cash pay prices for medical treatment has become a common practice. Often a cash-pay price for medical care can be much less than what you’d have to pay if you haven’t met your deductible.

Source: How cash-pay patients can beat high-deductible plans

The strategy of paying cash for medical care to get a better price originally appeared in The Los Angeles Times and is getting legs elsewhere such as here. That’s the way it was back in the 1950s and 1960s where people had “major medical” insurance that covered only large and unexpected medical care needs such as auto accidents and heart attacks. Everything else was paid on a cash basis.

Going forward, it bears watching to see if this gains momentum among those covered by high deductible plans. If it does, it could create downward pricing pressure on non-emergency medical procedures including primary care visits that aren’t preventative care and thus subject to out of pocket cost sharing.

Ditto high deductible plan rates. If more people pay providers directly rather than engaging in the paperwork exercise with their health plans for care falling well below their annual deductible, that reduces the administrative burden on the issuers of high deductible plans. As well as providers willing to negotiate a cash price knowing they’ll get paid sooner with less paperwork.

There’s an added bonus for high deductible plan members. At one time, having a high deductible plan meant a broader choice of providers. No longer the case with today’s narrow networks. Paying cash can potentially substantially widen the provider network to any provider willing to accept cash as payment in full for services.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

High out of pocket costs for major medical care warrant policy scrutiny

The cruel paradox of those with health insurance seeking bankruptcy protection from high medical bills could grow despite the policy intent of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to expand the safety net of individual health insurance.

It’s most likely to occur in the case of hospitalizations where multiple health care practitioners attend to an insured patient and only some of them are in the patient’s health plan provider network. The patient is then placed in the situation where his or her insurance plan isn’t subject to the calendar year out of pocket maximums ($6,350 for individuals; $12,700 for family coverage) that apply only for care rendered by providers in the plan’s provider network, potentially exposing patients to significantly higher bills. Emily Bazar of the California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) details one such instance involving a plan purchased through California’s health benefit exchange marketplace, Covered California, in her Sacramento Bee column.

This circumstance warrants study by the CHCF and other policy research organizations since it could occur nationwide. If such incidents increase, it could lead to calls for policy changes that make available all inclusive major medical coverage for hospital stays and other types of high cost care. Limited provider networks may be able to work fine for routine care like physician visits and exams, but can potentially leave major gaps for catastrophic care.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

California bill would bar higher out-of-network cost sharing when timely in-network care unavailable

Pending California legislation would bar health plans and insurers from imposing higher out of pocket costs for out of network services in instances where a plan or insurer is unable to ensure timely access to a medically necessary, covered service by a contracted provider.

Under existing law, California managed health care service plans are required to provide members timely access to providers. AB 2533 would require the California Department of Insurance to develop similar rules for insurance plans it regulates including waiting time for doctor appointments.

The proposed legislation comes amid reports of individuals in plans purchased through the state’s health benefit exchange marketplace, Covered California, being turned away by providers they believed were included in their plans. (Additional background here)

The measure passed its first policy committee this week in the state Assembly. Click here for the text of AB 2533 as amended April 22, 2014.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

%d bloggers like this: