Tag Archive: primary care

Politicians focus on wrong part of health-care problem: Advisor

Carolyn McClanahan, a certified financial planner and physician, believes there are some commonsense solutions to fixing the health-care system, and she feels the politicians are actually the problem and not the problem-solvers. “With the health-care system being so complicated, one of the problems I have is that the politicians are focusing on the wrong things,” said McClanahan, founder and director of financial planning at Life Planning Partners. “The No. 1 concern with health care right now is that we have a broken system and we need to fix the system. “And politicians are unfortunately focusing on how we pay for health care and not focusing on the cost of health care.”

Source: Politicians focus on wrong part of health-care problem: Advisor

McClanahan’s right. A far more holistic analysis is necessary whenever dealing with a complex system such as medical care costs and their financing. Since most agree costs have grown to unstainable levels and chew up far too many public and private dollars, that deserves a lot of attention. As well as thorough root cause analysis that takes into account population wellness and specifically how to increase it.

McClanahan’s thinking is on the right track. Fortunately, most people don’t need much medical care. The goal should be to ensure that cohort remains the majority and grows. We can’t get there with more medical care. Instead, more health care – engaging in health promoting behaviors and lifestyles — and developing health education and social values that support that are key.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Proposal: taxpayer funded primary care

In the United States, community health centers could be funded directly by the government based on population, not fee for service. They would provide a broad, well-defined range of services, including primary care, with weekend and evening hours, telemedicine, basic pharmaceuticals and education for management of chronic illness. Mental health care would be provided, including management of drug addiction. And they could serve as a base for managing crises such as epidemics and bioterrorism events. Anyone could use a community health center without income verification, free. People could still use private primary care providers, but they would have to pay for them, directly. Insurance would be reserved for emergencies, through inexpensive catastrophic coverage. Even Medicaid and Medicare could eventually be moved into a catastrophic-only model.

Source: What Spain Gets Right on Health Care – The New York Times

A couple of likely criticisms come to mind. First, would

Second, proposal is likely to face the major obstacle confronting proponents of single payer coverage, wherein the government covers both primary and catastrophic care: the entrenched employer-sponsored medical insurance benefit model that has been in place since the 1940s. Given

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Controlling Health Care Costs Through Limited Network Insurance Plans: Evidence from Massachusetts State Employees

We find that distance traveled falls for primary care and rises for tertiary care, although there is no evidence of a decrease in the quality of hospitals used by patients. The basic results hold even for the sickest patients, suggesting that limited network plans are saving money by directing care towards primary care and away from downstream spending. We find such savings only for those whose primary care physicians are included in limited network plans, however, suggesting that networks that are particularly restrictive on primary care access may fare less well than those that impose only stronger downstream restrictions.

via Controlling Health Care Costs Through Limited Network Insurance Plans: Evidence from Massachusetts State Employees.

 

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Consumer survey findings bode well for exchanges offering narrow network QHPs

A recent survey of consumer healthcare provider preferences by Harvard University and Booz & Company via the Harvard Business Review blog (Registration required) came up with some rather counterintuitive findings that bode well for the health benefit exchange marketplace. In order to keep premium rates low, some participating exchange qualified health plans (QHPs) have narrowed their networks of providers.

Consumers don’t necessarily prefer a wide selection of hospital networks. The survey found consumers preferred a small network with a high-quality system. “Consumers worried about receiving care for an unknown illness at some point in the future, find more comfort in knowing they will receive high quality care from a discrete set of facilities than in pondering a sea of options with little expertise in how to make sound decisions.” That makes sense considering that hospitalization isn’t typically a planned use of medical care and that most areas of the U.S. tend to be served by a small number of hospitals.

What’s noteworthy is the survey found the desire for a high-quality hospital system trumps having one’s primary care physician (PCP) in network, with respondents ranking an in-network PCP only half as important as having a good hospital system in network.  In a surprising finding, having one’s PCP in network represented less than five percent of the value consumers attribute to their health insurance. “While a dedicated patient/PCP relationship was once sacrosanct, today’s consumers are increasingly comfortable with getting primary care at retail clinics (e.g., CVS, Walgreens, Walmart, and Target) or using online and tele-health services that are quicker, more convenient, and often more cost-effective than a traditional office visit,” the HBR blog post notes. “Furthermore, as consumers become savvier in their decisions about benefits, even those who truly value their relationship with their PCP quickly recognize that picking up the occasional $150 co-pay to see a PCP who is no longer in-network is a relatively minor trade-off compared to the potential for a five-figure bill at an out-of-network hospital.”

Having upper-tier hospitals and health systems in network such as academic medical centers didn’t rank as a “must-have” among consumers.  “While reputation remains an important factor in consumers’ decisions, our research indicates that many safety-net and local hospitals are also well-regarded by consumers — and in particular by those who are currently uninsured. As such, lower-cost, high-value networks designed around these ‘lower-tier’ institutions could be attractive and desirable offerings for consumers.”

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Data illustrate growth in insurance coverage of primary care over 50-year period

The California HealthCare Foundation (CHCF) has produced an interactive graphic showing the sources of health care payments in the United States from 1960 to 2011. Particularly striking is the shift in physician and clinical services that comprise much of primary care. In the 1960s, most of these costs were paid directly out of pocket by patients. Beginning in the late 1970s, commercial insurance plans began picking up a larger proportion, reaching a peak of 49 percent in 2005 before declining slightly to 46 percent for 2011, according the CHCF compilation.

Proponents of pre-paid direct primary care contend that covering primary care in the same health plan as high cost catastrophic care such as hospitalization – covered under “major medical” policies in the 1960s — is as nonsensical as using car insurance to cover routine maintenance and oil changes.

The CHCF issued an issue brief on Direct Primary Care Medical Home Plans authored by Dave Chase noting these plans offer significant potential health care cost savings over all inclusive plans such as HMOs while providing economic incentive for primary care physicians – many of whom will be needed to care for new patients obtaining health coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

Little noticed ACA provision may hold key to restoring primacy to primary care to bend cost curve

Witnesses at a recent California legislative committee hearing bemoaned what is well known among health care policy wonks: poor access to primary care and its relationship to complex, chronic conditions that drive the 80-20 rule on health care spending: that 20 percent of patients account for 80 percent of the health care spend.

An excerpt from the California HealthCare Foundation’s California Healthline report on the hearing:

“We need to look at better management of chronic conditions,” said Assembly member Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), chair of the Committee on Health. “It’s one of the greatest cost factors in our health care system.”

How much cost?

The numbers are “astounding,” according to Sophia Chang, director of the Better Chronic Disease Care Program at the California HealthCare Foundation and one of the panelists at yesterday’s hearing. CHCF publishes California Healthline.

“We’re dealing with an epidemic,” Chang said. “Growing numbers, growing costs.”

The article goes on to quote testimony by Kevin Grumbach, chair of family and community medicine at UC-San Francisco:

“All this talk about chronic care and the patient-centered medical home is fundamentally about the primary care foundation of a well-functioning health care [system],” Grumbach said. “Systems that are built on a solid foundation of primary care are much better able to deliver the triple aim of better care, better outcomes and lower cost, and in an equitable way.”

Unfortunately, he said, California’s primary care system “is completely topsy turvy,” he said.

A little noticed provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act could contain the means of restoring the primacy of primary care and putting health insurance into the more logical and sensible role of covering large, unexpected medical costs.  It allows state health benefit exchanges to offer qualified health plans (QHPs) that are bundled with primary care directly paid by the insured, not the QHP. These “Direct Primary Care Medical Home Plan” QHPs would logically be those offering lower actuarial value (such as the “bronze” and “silver” metal tier plans that cover 60 and 70 percent, respectively, of expected claims costs).

Such a product could offer real benefits for both individuals and small businesses purchasing coverage in the exchanges starting this fall as well as for health plan issuers.  The former would benefit from lower premiums since they would be purchasing a lower cost plan. Health plans would benefit because insureds that pay for their own primary care – likely through pre-paid primary care contracts with primary care doctors and clinics – would have access to primary care and lifestyle coaching to ward off the development or progression of chronic conditions.  And primary care providers would also benefit by pre-paid direct primary care plans since they would provide a degree of predictability to their business models and potentially attract the large number of new primary care physicians that will be needed by the many newly insured under the ACA. That sounds like a promising means to achieve Grumbach’s triple aim.

Plan issuers, however, might initially resist offering such Section 1301(a)(3) plans since they would require them to retool their plans to be more like the “major medical” plans that predominated in the United States until all inclusive managed care plan models covering primary care proliferated beginning in the 1970s. But amid relentlessly rising medical costs that threaten their current business models and the opportunity presented by the new exchange marketplaces to devise new plans, now may be the right time for them to adopt DPC-based plans. Such plans might be marketed as “DPC (Direct Primary Care) compatible” just as high deductible plans are termed “HSA compatible.”

To spur their adoption, the Internal Revenue Code should be amended to allow individuals to take an income tax deduction for pre-paid direct primary care, just as they now can for contributions to health savings accounts.

 


Need a speaker or webinar presenter on the Affordable Care Act and the outlook for health care reform? Contact Pilot Healthcare Strategies Principal Fred Pilot by email fpilot@pilothealthstrategies.com or call 530-295-1473. 

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